A cataract is a clouding of the eyes natural crystalline lens that may affect one or both eyes. When left untreated, cataracts can progress over time and lead to severe loss of vision.
There is a painless progressive diminution of vision. Initially some help is achieved by changing the spectacle number, but in advance cases the spectacles also prove to be ineffective.
The formation of cataracts is a natural part of the aging process which is called senile cataract. Cataract can sometimes occur in the new born due to development problems, in the young due to injury and in any age due to an extension of another eye problem.
There is a painless gradual decrease in vision. Early cataract is associated with difficulty in reading in normal light conditions, and extra illumination is required. Excessive glare and reduced sharpness can make night driving difficult. In advanced cases there is complete loss of sight and pupil becomes pearly white in color.
There are no medications or other treatments to make cataracts go away. The answer lies only in surgery where the cataract is removed and replaced by an intra-ocular lens (IOL).
This is the best accepted technique (surgery) to remove cataract in the world through which a small 2-3 millimeter incision technique is used that does not require injection, stitch and bandage. Through this small incision, the cloudy natural lens is removed by an ultrasonic instrument and a clear, foldable artificial lens is placed inside the eye to replace the lens that was removed. These lens implants, or IntraOcular Lenses (IOLs), are made of plastic, silicone, or acrylic, requiring no care or maintenance, and become a permanent part of the eye. The procedure is called Phacoemulsification or Phaco.
As this technique does not require injection, stitch and bandage a person may resume routine activities within a day or two after surgery. It also reduces post-operative discomfort, shortens stays in the operating room, and improves post-operative recoveries.
The lens which is placed in the eye is of a fixed power. The power of the lens for a particular eye is calculated with the help of an eye ultrasound. After surgery, for most patients routine distance activities can be carried out without glasses. For reading, glasses would be required.
Yes. These are called multifocal intra-ocular lens and give good vision without glasses for distance and reading. However in certain eye condition, a need for using a little spectacle correction may be felt for very fine work.
It is easier and safer to operate on an immature cataract by Phaco. As the cataract matures, it tends to become harder requiring more Phaco energy to do the same job. Beyond a certain limit, excess energy may cause harm to the eye.
Foldable (soft) lens has a diameter of 6.0 mm and is made of plastic, silicone, or acrylic. It can be injected through a needle into the eye through the 2-3 mm opening made for the surgery and the lens unfolds automatically to take its position. Non-foldable (hard) lens has a diameter of 5.5 mm and the incision has to be enlarged to 5.5 mm to introduce this lens. However the incision still remains self-sealing and requires no sutures, but it may induce some curvature changes in the eye.
The Blood Pressure (BP) and Blood Sugar should be in control. E C G and a medical checkup may be required in some cases
All vision disorders for which glasses have to be used are measured in terms of sphere, cylinder or a combination of both. The best-corrected vision is termed 6/6 or 20/20. In simple Lasik, the sphere and cylinder power of a person eye is fed into the memory of the laser machine, and the laser then corrects the error.
95% of the people will be totally free from their spectacles. 5% will have mild variation from their zero targeted correction due to varying healing patterns in different individuals, but will have their dependency reduced on spectacles. After 3 to 6 months laser enhancement can be attempted to correct these individuals further. People over the age of 45 who opt for distance vision correction, may need reading glasses.
The effects of lasik on the cornea are permanent. Sometimes, internal changes within an eye may come with age and these may have some effect on the overall visual status. For example, a high myopia may progress even after the age of 18 years, or a person may require reading glasses after the age of forty like any normal individual.
After 2 to 3 days.
Lasik is a very safe procedure but like any other surgical procedure it can have some complications which are extremely rare if a proper screening check is done prior to the procedure. This includes measuring the corneal thickness with an ultrasound, Orbscan analysis of the cornea and a retina check. Nobody in our surgical experience has ever lost sight due to this procedure.
You should avoid wearing contact lenses for 1 week (at the least 3 days) prior to lasik. On the day of lasik avoid any form of facial and eye cosmetics and perfumes. After lasik , you can resume all your routine activities in 2-3 days. However, if your profession involves excessive computer use then it is advisable to wait for one week before resuming your work.
No, your eyes will not be patched after the LASIK eye surgery. You will wear eye shields at bedtime for one week for protection after the procedure.
You will use medicated eye drops for 1 week after your treatment. Artificial tears are recommended to help alleviate dry eyes. In some circumstances, your surgeon may recommend an eye drop to increase tear production.
Generally speaking a patient is on eye drops for 8 weeks.
Yes, LASIK can successfully treat all three of these vision conditions.
No, LASIK is not an appropriate surgery for cataracts. LASIK is performed on the front surface (cornea) of the eye. Cataract surgery is the replacement of the cloudy lens inside the eye with an implant.
We typically ask the patient to arrive one hour prior to the scheduled surgery time to ensure that we have answered all of your questions and to perform any tests required for final surgical planning. The actual surgical time is typically less than 10 minutes per eye.
In the vast majority of cases, LASIK is performed on both eyes during the same session. However one eye may be done at a time by choice.
No, you will need to arrange for a ride home. Because it is likely that you'll have light sensitivity and some discomfort for 3 -4 hours after your procedure, it is best that you rest at home that evening.
Most patients experience very little discomfort during laser eye surgery. During the first few days after treatment you may experience some discomfort but medication and eye drops will assist with this.
Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases involving progressive damage to the optic nerve accompanied by a build up of pressure inside the eye. It is a sight threatening and often symptom less diseases and has a strong family history. If left untreated, glaucoma can result in significant vision loss and even blindness.
Worldwide, glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Millions of people are blind in both eyes from this disease. Many individuals with glaucoma, however, may not know that they have the disease. The reason they are unaware is that glaucoma initially causes no symptoms, and the subsequent loss of side vision (peripheral vision) is usually not recognized.
The 2 main types of glaucoma are open-angle glaucoma and angle-closure glaucoma. In angle-closure glaucoma, the normal drainage canals within the eye are blocked, and this block can be acute (sudden) or chronic (long-lasting). In open-angle glaucoma, the drainage system remains open, but is dysfunctional. Other types include congenital glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma, and secondary glaucoma.
There are usually no signs that an individual is developing glaucoma until vision loss occurs, which is why it's so important to have regular eye exams. An eye doctor can detect and treat high IOP before it progresses to optic nerve damage and vision loss.
A glaucoma suspect is a person in whom, the doctor’s opinion, there is a high chance of developing glaucoma. This maybe due to the elevated eye pressure or the appearance of the optic nerves. Some people may have pressures that are higher than normal, but is not associated with optic nerve damage and vision loss, but they do not develop glaucoma, and are called ocular hypertensives. Other people have optic nerves that might appear to be abnormal, but, in fact, are actually normal for them.
Everyone is at risk for glaucoma. However certain groups are at higher risk than others. People at high risk for glaucoma should get a complete eye exam, including eye dilation, every one or two years. If you are over age 60, diabetic or have a family member with glaucoma, you are at higher risk for glaucoma than others. Other risk factors are steroid users, eye injury, High myopia (nearsightedness), Hypertension, central corneal thickness less than .5 mm etc.
An eye doctor (ophthalmologist) can usually detect those individuals who are at risk for before nerve damage occurs. The doctor also can diagnose patients who already have glaucoma by observing their nerve damage or visual field loss. These tests includes Tonometry, Gonioscopy, Ophthalmoscopy, Pachymetry, Visual Field testing all of which are painless, may be part of this evaluation.
The only known method of treating glaucoma is to decrease the eye pressure. For this, your doctor will prescribe eye drops, and in rare conditions, oral medications. If eye drops alone do not lower the pressure enough, laser procedures or surgery may be required. Patients of angle closure glaucoma need a laser treatment called peripheral iridectomy, which is an attempt to create a bypass channel to restore the drainage in the eye.
Vision loss from glaucoma cannot be reversed. Routine eye exams are essential to discover glaucoma early and begin glaucoma treatment before significant vision loss has occurred.
People being treated for glaucoma typically are not good candidates for LASIK. This is because a suction device is used on the eye during the creation of the corneal flap during LASIK surgery, and this briefly causes a significant increase in IOP.
The retina is a very thin layer of tissue that lines the inner part of the back of the eye and functions like the film of a camera. It captures light like camera film and then transmits that image to the brain so that it can be processed into a visual image. The macula is the most specialized area of this retina tissue and allows us to see detailed, central vision. This is the vision that allows us to read, watch television, and recognize faces.
Any of the following symptoms are an eye emergency and you must consult a doctor immediately. Light flashes, or curtain obstructing part or all of your vision, a sudden shower of floaters that resemble spots, or spider webs and a sudden decrease of vision.
You need to contact your eye specialist urgently. Receiving immediate treatment increases the chances of you regaining or retaining your vision, and limiting further loss.
Macula is the most sensitive part of the retina and its degration results in loss of vision. It may present as a decrease in vision, distortion of objects or impaired colour vision. There are two types of macualr degeneration: wet and dry.Regular eye exams are recommended to detect macular degeneration the early stage.

Diabetic eye disease refers to a group of eye problems that people with diabetes may face as a complication of this disease. All can cause severe vision loss or even blindness. Diabetic eye disease includes:

  • Diabetic retinopathy: Damage to the blood vessels in the retina.
  • Cataract: Clouding of the lens of the eye.
  • Glaucoma: Increase in fluid pressure inside the eye that leads to optic nerve damage and loss of vision.
Diabetic retinopathy. This disease is a leading cause of blindness in the world. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. In some people with diabetic retinopathy, retinal blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In other people, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. These changes may result in vision loss or blindness.
Yes. Eye care professional may suggest laser surgery in which a strong light beam is aimed onto the retina. Laser surgery and appropriate followup care can reduce the risk of blindness by 90 percent. However, laser surgery often cannot restore vision that has already been lost, which is why finding diabetic retinopathy early is the best way to prevent vision loss.
Not totally, but risk can be greatly reduced. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) showed that better control of blood sugar level slows the onset and progression of retinopathy and lessens the need for laser surgery for severe retinopathy.

If you have diabetes, you are also at risk for other diabetic eye diseases, such as cataract and glaucoma. People with diabetes develop cataract at an earlier age than people without diabetes. Cataract can usually be treated by surgery.

A person with diabetes is nearly twice as likely to get glaucoma as other adults. And, as with diabetic retinopathy, the longer you have had diabetes, the greater your risk of getting glaucoma. Glaucoma may be treated with medications, laser surgery, or conventional surgery.

Finding and treating the disease early, before it causes vision loss or blindness, is the best way to control diabetic eye disease. So if you have diabetes, make sure you get a comprehensive dilated eye examination at least once a year.
A cataract is a clouding of the eyes natural crystalline lens that may affect one or both eyes. When left untreated, cataracts can progress over time and lead to severe loss of vision.
There is a painless progressive diminution of vision. Initially some help is achieved by changing the spectacle number, but in advance cases the spectacles also prove to be ineffective.
The formation of cataracts is a natural part of the aging process which is called senile cataract. Cataract can sometimes occur in the new born due to development problems, in the young due to injury and in any age due to an extension of another eye problem.
There is a painless gradual decrease in vision. Early cataract is associated with difficulty in reading in normal light conditions, and extra illumination is required. Excessive glare and reduced sharpness can make night driving difficult. In advanced cases there is complete loss of sight and pupil becomes pearly white in color.
There are no medications or other treatments to make cataracts go away. The answer lies only in surgery where the cataract is removed and replaced by an intra-ocular lens (IOL).
This is the best accepted technique (surgery) to remove cataract in the world through which a small 2-3 millimeter incision technique is used that does not require injection, stitch and bandage. Through this small incision, the cloudy natural lens is removed by an ultrasonic instrument and a clear, foldable artificial lens is placed inside the eye to replace the lens that was removed. These lens implants, or IntraOcular Lenses (IOLs), are made of plastic, silicone, or acrylic, requiring no care or maintenance, and become a permanent part of the eye. The procedure is called Phacoemulsification or Phaco.
As this technique does not require injection, stitch and bandage a person may resume routine activities within a day or two after surgery. It also reduces post-operative discomfort, shortens stays in the operating room, and improves post-operative recoveries.
The lens which is placed in the eye is of a fixed power. The power of the lens for a particular eye is calculated with the help of an eye ultrasound. After surgery, for most patients routine distance activities can be carried out without glasses. For reading, glasses would be required.
Yes. These are called multifocal intra-ocular lens and give good vision without glasses for distance and reading. However in certain eye condition, a need for using a little spectacle correction may be felt for very fine work.
It is easier and safer to operate on an immature cataract by Phaco. As the cataract matures, it tends to become harder requiring more Phaco energy to do the same job. Beyond a certain limit, excess energy may cause harm to the eye.
Foldable (soft) lens has a diameter of 6.0 mm and is made of plastic, silicone, or acrylic. It can be injected through a needle into the eye through the 2-3 mm opening made for the surgery and the lens unfolds automatically to take its position. Non-foldable (hard) lens has a diameter of 5.5 mm and the incision has to be enlarged to 5.5 mm to introduce this lens. However the incision still remains self-sealing and requires no sutures, but it may induce some curvature changes in the eye.
The Blood Pressure (BP) and Blood Sugar should be in control. E C G and a medical checkup may be required in some cases
All vision disorders for which glasses have to be used are measured in terms of sphere, cylinder or a combination of both. The best-corrected vision is termed 6/6 or 20/20. In simple Lasik, the sphere and cylinder power of a person eye is fed into the memory of the laser machine, and the laser then corrects the error.
95% of the people will be totally free from their spectacles. 5% will have mild variation from their zero targeted correction due to varying healing patterns in different individuals, but will have their dependency reduced on spectacles. After 3 to 6 months laser enhancement can be attempted to correct these individuals further. People over the age of 45 who opt for distance vision correction, may need reading glasses.
The effects of lasik on the cornea are permanent. Sometimes, internal changes within an eye may come with age and these may have some effect on the overall visual status. For example, a high myopia may progress even after the age of 18 years, or a person may require reading glasses after the age of forty like any normal individual.
After 2 to 3 days.
Lasik is a very safe procedure but like any other surgical procedure it can have some complications which are extremely rare if a proper screening check is done prior to the procedure. This includes measuring the corneal thickness with an ultrasound, Orbscan analysis of the cornea and a retina check. Nobody in our surgical experience has ever lost sight due to this procedure.
You should avoid wearing contact lenses for 1 week (at the least 3 days) prior to lasik. On the day of lasik avoid any form of facial and eye cosmetics and perfumes. After lasik , you can resume all your routine activities in 2-3 days. However, if your profession involves excessive computer use then it is advisable to wait for one week before resuming your work.
To this date there have been no reported cases of total loss of vision.
No, your eyes will not be patched after the LASIK eye surgery. You will wear eye shields at bedtime for one week for protection after the procedure.
You will use medicated eye drops for 1 week after your treatment. Artificial tears are recommended to help alleviate dry eyes. In some circumstances, your surgeon may recommend an eye drop to increase tear production.
Generally speaking a patient is on eye drops for 8 weeks.
Yes, LASIK can successfully treat all three of these vision conditions.
No, LASIK is not an appropriate surgery for cataracts. LASIK is performed on the front surface (cornea) of the eye. Cataract surgery is the replacement of the cloudy lens inside the eye with an implant.
We typically ask the patient to arrive one hour prior to the scheduled surgery time to ensure that we have answered all of your questions and to perform any tests required for final surgical planning. The actual surgical time is typically less than 10 minutes per eye.
In the vast majority of cases, LASIK is performed on both eyes during the same session. However one eye may be done at a time by choice.
No, you will need to arrange for a ride home. Because it is likely that you'll have light sensitivity and some discomfort for 3 -4 hours after your procedure, it is best that you rest at home that evening.
Most patients experience very little discomfort during laser eye surgery. During the first few days after treatment you may experience some discomfort but medication and eye drops will assist with this.
Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases involving progressive damage to the optic nerve accompanied by a build up of pressure inside the eye. It is a sight threatening and often symptom less diseases and has a strong family history. If left untreated, glaucoma can result in significant vision loss and even blindness.
Worldwide, glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Millions of people are blind in both eyes from this disease. Many individuals with glaucoma, however, may not know that they have the disease. The reason they are unaware is that glaucoma initially causes no symptoms, and the subsequent loss of side vision (peripheral vision) is usually not recognized.
The 2 main types of glaucoma are open-angle glaucoma and angle-closure glaucoma. In angle-closure glaucoma, the normal drainage canals within the eye are blocked, and this block can be acute (sudden) or chronic (long-lasting). In open-angle glaucoma, the drainage system remains open, but is dysfunctional. Other types include congenital glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma, and secondary glaucoma.
There are usually no signs that an individual is developing glaucoma until vision loss occurs, which is why it's so important to have regular eye exams. An eye doctor can detect and treat high IOP before it progresses to optic nerve damage and vision loss.
A glaucoma suspect is a person in whom, the doctor’s opinion, there is a high chance of developing glaucoma. This maybe due to the elevated eye pressure or the appearance of the optic nerves. Some people may have pressures that are higher than normal, but is not associated with optic nerve damage and vision loss, but they do not develop glaucoma, and are called ocular hypertensives. Other people have optic nerves that might appear to be abnormal, but, in fact, are actually normal for them.
Everyone is at risk for glaucoma. However certain groups are at higher risk than others. People at high risk for glaucoma should get a complete eye exam, including eye dilation, every one or two years. If you are over age 60, diabetic or have a family member with glaucoma, you are at higher risk for glaucoma than others. Other risk factors are steroid users, eye injury, High myopia (nearsightedness), Hypertension, central corneal thickness less than .5 mm etc.
An eye doctor (ophthalmologist) can usually detect those individuals who are at risk for before nerve damage occurs. The doctor also can diagnose patients who already have glaucoma by observing their nerve damage or visual field loss. These tests includes Tonometry, Gonioscopy, Ophthalmoscopy, Pachymetry, Visual Field testing all of which are painless, may be part of this evaluation.
The only known method of treating glaucoma is to decrease the eye pressure. For this, your doctor will prescribe eye drops, and in rare conditions, oral medications. If eye drops alone do not lower the pressure enough, laser procedures or surgery may be required. Patients of angle closure glaucoma need a laser treatment called peripheral iridectomy, which is an attempt to create a bypass channel to restore the drainage in the eye.
Vision loss from glaucoma cannot be reversed. Routine eye exams are essential to discover glaucoma early and begin glaucoma treatment before significant vision loss has occurred.
People being treated for glaucoma typically are not good candidates for LASIK. This is because a suction device is used on the eye during the creation of the corneal flap during LASIK surgery, and this briefly causes a significant increase in IOP.
The retina is a very thin layer of tissue that lines the inner part of the back of the eye and functions like the film of a camera. It captures light like camera film and then transmits that image to the brain so that it can be processed into a visual image. The macula is the most specialized area of this retina tissue and allows us to see detailed, central vision. This is the vision that allows us to read, watch television, and recognize faces.
Any of the following symptoms are an eye emergency and you must consult a doctor immediately. Light flashes, or curtain obstructing part or all of your vision, a sudden shower of floaters that resemble spots, or spider webs and a sudden decrease of vision.
You need to contact your eye specialist urgently. Receiving immediate treatment increases the chances of you regaining or retaining your vision, and limiting further loss.
Macula is the most sensitive part of the retina and its degration results in loss of vision. It may present as a decrease in vision, distortion of objects or impaired colour vision. There are two types of macualr degeneration: wet and dry.Regular eye exams are recommended to detect macular degeneration the early stage.

Diabetic eye disease refers to a group of eye problems that people with diabetes may face as a complication of this disease. All can cause severe vision loss or even blindness. Diabetic eye disease includes:

  • Diabetic retinopathy: Damage to the blood vessels in the retina.
  • Cataract: Clouding of the lens of the eye.
  • Glaucoma: Increase in fluid pressure inside the eye that leads to optic nerve damage and loss of vision.
Diabetic retinopathy. This disease is a leading cause of blindness in the world. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. In some people with diabetic retinopathy, retinal blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In other people, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. These changes may result in vision loss or blindness.
Yes. Eye care professional may suggest laser surgery in which a strong light beam is aimed onto the retina. Laser surgery and appropriate followup care can reduce the risk of blindness by 90 percent. However, laser surgery often cannot restore vision that has already been lost, which is why finding diabetic retinopathy early is the best way to prevent vision loss.
Not totally, but risk can be greatly reduced. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) showed that better control of blood sugar level slows the onset and progression of retinopathy and lessens the need for laser surgery for severe retinopathy.

If you have diabetes, you are also at risk for other diabetic eye diseases, such as cataract and glaucoma. People with diabetes develop cataract at an earlier age than people without diabetes. Cataract can usually be treated by surgery.

A person with diabetes is nearly twice as likely to get glaucoma as other adults. And, as with diabetic retinopathy, the longer you have had diabetes, the greater your risk of getting glaucoma. Glaucoma may be treated with medications, laser surgery, or conventional surgery.

Finding and treating the disease early, before it causes vision loss or blindness, is the best way to control diabetic eye disease. So if you have diabetes, make sure you get a comprehensive dilated eye examination at least once a year.